A Blessed Life (19)

A Blessed Life (19)

As my freshman year at Southeastern Christian College was unfolding, my relationship with Colleen was growing more serious. When the year ended in May, I bought a ring and asked her to marry me. We were both eighteen at the time, and when we married in August of 1965, she was still 18, and I was a mature nineteen years old, or so I thought. Once again I had made a serious decision with little or no serious thought. But some fifty three years later I can honestly say that I have never once regretted that decision. We would both agree that two unprepared young lovers grew up together under the providence and grace of God. We were also blessed to have parents who were married for over fifty years as role models.
The fall of 1965 we were back in school. Our three room apartment was over the college gymnasium. I think it had been condemned, but somehow we were able to fix it up and live there for $40 a month. The college gym was also home to Clark County High School back at that time. When the high school had a home game our apartment literally shook with the excitement. There was no rest nor was there any privacy. Our bedroom door, and the only door opened onto the gym’s balcony. This was not an ideal arrangement to say the least. Through it all we survived and graduated from junior college in May of 1966.
Married, out of school, and still no clear direction. We moved back to Cynthiana and rented an upstairs apartment from a lady from the Mt. Carmel Christian Church. She was sweet, but she felt perfectly comfortable checking in on us unannounced. I worked that summer surveying tobacco allotments and Colleen got a job in a local factory. Our plan was for me to commute to Georgetown College come fall. As so often in the past, there came a new direction, one I followed with no real planning.
By now it was becoming obvious that I really had no clear direction for my life. I was so blessed to have a wife who followed my whims, and a God who had plans I could never have imagined.

– Terry A. Morrison